Kullez/flickr

Yeah, it's unbearable out right now. But do you really have it worse than your fellow Americans?

A team of scientists at environmental consulting company Environmental Health & Engineering, in partnership with the makers of Honeywell Fans, have ranked U.S. cities based on their "potential sweatiness." Using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data, they determined which metropolises have the greatest propensity to trap heat during summer months, and thus make its citizens drip sweat.

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Here are the results, along with our determination of what entity or entities in the city are perspiring most.

10.  Charlotte

Charlotte is a sweaty town, but there are 9 sweatier! (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entity: M.J.

9.  Dallas

The sweaty, sweaty skyline of Dallas. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entities: These steers.

8.  Los Angeles

I was not caught. I crossed the line. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entity: Det. Ray Velcoro

7.  Raleigh

Wikimedia

Sweatiest entities: These people.

6. Washington D.C.

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Sweatiest entities: Tourists.

5.  Orlando

The person inside this Mickey Mouse costume is also probably very sweaty! (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entities: Parents.

4.  San Diego

A Polar bear at the San Diego Zoo. Probably not sweating! (Photo by Tammy Spratt/San Diego Zoo via Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entity: That gal above.

3.  Houston

Houston, we have a problem: sweat stains! (Photo by Bill Stafford/NASA via Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entity: The above room.

2.  Miami

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Sweatiest entities: not South Beach developers, for some reason.

1.  Tampa

Look how sweaty this place looks! (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Sweatiest entity: No idea because this is another reason why we will never visit Tampa.

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Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.