Photo: USGS handout/Getty Images, GIF animation: Elena Scotti/Fusion

You know that thing where people celebrate Earth Day by planting a tree? That's wonderful and well-intentioned and all, but is there any way they could plant a glacier instead? Because that would be super helpful.

Global warming, climate change—whatever you want to call it, it's happening. And 97 percent of climate scientists agree that the trend is likely the result of human activities (see the Industrial Revolution and basically everything that followed) and not just a naturally occurring warming period for the planet.

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NASA points to rising sea levels, warmer ocean temperatures, a decline in Arctic sea ice, and shrinking glaciers as evidence of a human-induced global warming, all of which will continue to have a huge impact on the Earth's plant and animal life. Thanks to the satellite imagery collected by the U.S. Geological Survey below, we can examine some of this evidence more closely.

Here's Washington's South Cascade Glacier in 2000 and 2006.

Photo: USGS handout/Getty Images, GIF animation: Elena Scotti/Fusion

You can see how much the glacier's terminus, or end point, decreased in those six years.

And this is Alaska's Bering Glacier in 1996 and 2005.

Photo: USGS handout/Getty Images, GIF animation: Elena Scotti/Fusion

The USGS says that the glacier's terminus has retreated by more than three miles since its peak size in the '90s.

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Moving on from glaciers, check out how much the ice retreated in the Arctic Ocean's Beaufort Sea between 2001 and 2007.

Photo: USGS handout/Getty Images, GIF animation: Elena Scotti/Fusion

In 2001, the ice was able to form small pools (those dark spots) to absorb the sun's radiation while preserving the surrounding ice during the summer. By 2007, that wall of defense appears to have been worn down.

This final image shows the Chukchi Sea in Barrow, Alaska, in 2006 and 2007.

Photo: USGS handout/Getty Images, GIF animation: Elena Scotti/Fusion

The sea ice that forms in the winter is supposed to melt and break away from the coast by mid-summer, but there's barely any sea ice left by July 2007.

Bad at filling out bios seeks same.